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We Came Here to Burgle Your Turts!

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There is Only Me. There is Only My Way

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Come on Sheriff: It's a Rock Fact.

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Sometimes I feel like I'm just like...a boat. Further and further, drifting away from where I want to be. Who, I want to be.

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The master is a character who appears in "Songs of the Dark Lantern".

Appearance

The master wears a maroon frock coat, a gray waistcoat, gray pants, a white ascot, white dress shirt with collars up, and black riding boots. He has styled brown hair and light skin. He keeps his apprentice on a rope tied around his waist.

Biography

The master and his apprentice were at the tavern when Wirt, Gregory, and Beatrice arrived there. He was pointed out by the Tavern Keeper along with his apprentice. When Wirt failed to produce a label for himself, the master suggested that Wirt was "simple". After the butcher called Wirt a "pilgrim", the master explained that a pilgrim was the master of his own destiny.

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